The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty (2013)

husbandssecretThe title intrigued me and I was not disappointed. Although Liane Moriarty cleverly interweaves the stories of three women, the husband’s secret is the thread that ties them all together. Cecilia accidentally found the letter her husband wrote to be read after his death. John-Paul didn’t die, but Cecilia’s decision to open it anyway set into motion a series of events that profoundly affect the lives of three families in the St. Angela’s School community in Sydney.

In The Husband’s Secret, twists and turns in the plot and characters’ reactions leave the reader questioning the outcome until the very end.

The Singles Game by Lauren Weisberger (2016)

singlesgameAfter a devastating injury at Wimbledon, 24-year-old Charlotte “Charlie” Silver questions her coach and her sedate lifestyle, but not her future in the sport of tennis. How far is she willing to go to make it to the top? In this delightfully snarky fast-paced coming of age tale, Lauren Weisberger provides a fascinating glimpse into the world of competitive tennis. Perfect for the beach!

The Singles Game is the latest novel from the author of The Devil Wears Prada.

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman (2014)

manoveTo Ove, everything was black or white and controlled by routine, but Sonja gave color to his life. Now he just wants to be with her again. In the first few chapters, the reader sees Ove’s grumpy nature and then his sadness as he tries to deal with this great change that has occurred. Ove’s efforts are continuously interrupted by neighbors who want help, backing a trailer or regulating the radiators in their homes. Most of the time Ove is annoyed by their requests and shows it but he seems to have a good heart and always helps. Soon the young girls next door brings him cookies and call him Grandpa. With a little persuasion, even the neighborhood stray cat takes up with Ove.

Fredrik Backman’s A Man Called Ove is a sad but funny short novel that can be a delight to both young and old. And now you can also enjoy another novel by Backman: Britt-Marie Was Here was released in May.

Everybody’s Fool by Richard Russo (2016)

everybodysfoolThis sequel to Richard Russo’s 1993 novel Nobody’s Fool is set ten years later in the dying mill town of North Bath, New York. “Sully” Sullivan, hero of the first book, is mostly retired now after having his OTN bet pay off. His hapless sidekick, Rub, is at loose ends without Sully to tell him what to do every minute of the day.

Police Chief Douglas Raymer, a minor character in the first book, who considers Sully enemy number one, moves front and center. Raymer is a sad sack who sees himself as everybody’s fool. Still miserable over the accidental death of his wife who was on the verge of leaving him, Raymer is too morosely self-absorbed to see what is right in front of him. Funny and sweet, Everybody’s Fool is a book for those who are more interested in character than plot.

Revenge of the Witch by Joseph Delaney (2006)

revengewitchAre you looking for something action packed to satisfy your fantasy fix? Give Joseph Delaney’s Revenge of the Witch a try! It is the first novel of his Last Apprentice series and doesn’t disappoint.

Tom Ward is the seventh son of a seventh son which makes him exceedingly extraordinary. There are only a few others like him in the county and he’s about to be apprenticed to one that is older and wiser: Mr. Gregory, aka the Spook. Their special births causes Tom and other seventh sons to be able to see spirits and detect dark magic that normal people would have no idea is there.

Follow along on Tom’s and the Spook’s adventures, and you’ll be turning the pages into the wee hours of the night! (Though make sure to keep the light bright because these adventures are not for the faint of heart!)

A Necessary End by Holly Brown (2015)

necessaryendAdrienne is 39 and desperate to be a mother. Her husband Gabe isn’t that anxious to have a family, but goes along with the idea to please his wife. After failed IVF attempts and being scammed by a fake birth mother, Adrienne is willing to do anything to fulfill her dream. Into their lives comes 19-year-old Leah, who is pregnant and not interested in keeping her baby. Leah, however, has some stipulations, including living with Adrienne and Gabe for one year before signing the adoption papers. What could possibly go wrong? Well, just about everything.

A Necessary End is a good psychological thriller, told from two different viewpoints. Holly Brown’s novel includes some unexpected twists toward the end.

A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson (2015)

godinruinsAfter reading – and very much enjoying – Life After Life, the idea of more Todd family adventures was appealing. Kate Atkinson calls A God in Ruins a companion novel to Life After Life, not a sequel. She takes one of the alternate realities of Ursula’s adored younger brother Ted, and develops the storyline after his miraculous recovery from a plane crash as a bomber pilot in World War II. The novel alternates between Ted’s wartime experiences and his civilian life as father and grandfather. Curious readers of Life After Life will also be treated to an excerpt from Aunt Izzie’s The Adventures of Augustus, the character she modeled after Teddy. Atkinson continues to test the reader’s concepts of time and fiction with this engaging novel.

My Journey into the Wilds of Chicago: A Celebration of Chicagoland’s Startling Natural Wonders by Mike MacDonald (2015)

chicagojourneyA paean to the wild beauty of Chicagoland’s nature preserves, prairies, and wetlands. Mike MacDonald’s stunning photos and beautiful prose will inspire readers to visit the natural areas highlighted in his book, and to learn more about the plants and animals that inhabit the wilds of Chicago.

Watch an interview with the author and photographer on WTTW’s Chicago Tonight to learn more about My Journey into the Wilds of Chicago.

The Children by Ann Leary (2016)

childrenA rambling Connecticut lake house is the refuge for widowed Joan and her two grown daughters, bipolar concert violinist Sally and near-recluse Charlotte. Charlotte spends her days in the attic working on her very popular, but thoroughly fictional, mommy blog and hooking up with neighbor Everett whenever she can. Into this sheltered environment comes beloved stepbrother Spin with his too-good-to-be-true fiancée, Laurel. Is Laurel all she says she is, or do her lies rival the stories fabricated by Charlotte about her completely adorable but fictional children? A little quirky and humorous, Ann Leary’s The Children provides a glimpse into how the “other half” lives.