Category Archives: Jennifer

Because of Miss Bridgerton by Julia Quinn (2016)

missbridgertonWith her trademark humor and snappy dialogue, Julia Quinn introduces readers to a new generation of Bridgertons–and launches a new series with Because of Miss Bridgerton. Neighbors Billie Bridgerton and George Rokesby have bickered their entire lives. But when Billie needs rescuing after her impulsive actions land her on the roof of an abandoned farmhouse, something changes… You’ll relish the journey in this sparkling, delightful historical romance.

Curious about those other Bridgertons? We own (in print and ebook) the witty novels featuring each of the eight siblings.

Be Frank with Me by Julia Claiborne Johnson (2016)

befrank9-year-old Frank is quirky, lovable, and exasperating. He has trouble relating to other kids, he dresses like a 1930s movie star, and he’s full of random facts. His mother Mimi (better known as M. M. Banning) wrote an incomparable novel at 19. She’s published nothing since (think Harper Lee).

When 50ish Mimi promises to write a second novel if she has an assistant, her publisher sends Alice. A New Yorker thrust into the eccentricities of Hollywood, Alice must decipher the craziness that is now her life.

An endearing and clever novel, Be Frank with Me is easily a one-sitting read. You’ll be turning the pages of Julia Claiborne Johnson’s debut to find out just what will happen next.

Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys (2016)

saltseaTitanic. Lusitania. Wilhelm Gustloff. All major maritime disasters, yet the latter is virtually unknown. Ruta Sepetys changes that in her latest gripping historical novel. Told in short snippets, Salt to the Sea rotates between four narrators attempting to escape various tragedies in 1945 Europe. Powerful and haunting, heartbreaking and hopeful, a must-read for adults and teens.

As she did in Between Shades of Gray, Sepetys sheds light on a little known slice of history, drawing you into the story through the eyes of unforgettable characters.

The Rogue Not Taken by Sarah MacLean (2015)

roguenottakenSophie Talbot doesn’t suffer fools…which backfires when her impulsive action involving her degenerate brother-in-law (a duke) and a fish pond is witnessed by all of society. Thwarting her escape is the rakish Kingscote, Marquess of Eversley, who thinks she’s trying to trap him into marriage. What follows is a crazy adventure across England with witty repartee and unexpected discoveries. Plus, (truly) dark secrets are revealed in The Rogue Not Taken. Prepare to fall in love with Sarah MacLean in this series starter.

Emma by Jane Austen (1815)

emmaJuliet Stevenson‘s delightful rendition of this classic was the perfect way to experience Jane Austen. Her command of the many characters and their quirks brought out the humor and heart in Austen’s words.

Check out the audio version of Emma in Hoopla, or read a print copy. And if you already know (and love) Emma, check out Georgette Heyer’s The Grand Sophy. I think you’ll see a few endearing similarities between Emma and Sophy.

The Martian by Andy Weir (2014)

martianDid I understand all of the science? No. But it didn’t matter. I challenge you not to get drawn into Mark Watney’s epic quest for survival after he is accidentally left behind on Mars. A thrilling adventure, The Martian is largely told through the log entries of this snarky astronaut with glimpses of NASA personnel on Earth and in space. You may have seen the Matt Damon-led movie adaptation (or at least the previews), but I encourage you to pick up Andy Weir‘s novel!

How to Start a Fire by Lisa Lutz (2015)

startafireIn a departure from her Spellman mysteries, Lisa Lutz explores the friendship between three women over a twenty-year span. Anna, Kate, and George meet in college. Through heartbreak and triumph, their lives are revealed in an engaging story with multiple perspectives and a non-linear timeline.

While this is women’s fiction and not mystery, How to Start a Fire has the signature Lutz quirky characters and quick wit. A clever yet reflective look at the ebbs and flows of lifelong friendships.

The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henriquez (2014)

unknownamericansTold in alternating first person narratives, The Book of Unknown Americans details the experiences of multiple Latin American immigrants living in a Delaware apartment complex. Cristina Henriquez’ moving, compelling tale showcases families, communities, triumphs, and tragedies.

I loved this book – the endearing characters, the enthralling story, and the lyrical writing grabbed me, prompting me to keep frantically turning the pages, only to be disappointed when there were no more pages to turn.

For other immigrant experiences, check out our bibliography here.

The Other Daughter by Lauren Willig (2015)

otherdaughterThe glittering veneer of the Bright Young Things cracks under the pressure of secrets large and small in 1920s England. After her mother’s death, governess Rachel Woodley discovers her father isn’t a long deceased botanist, but a powerful earl living in London. A chance meeting with a gossip columnist launches Rachel’s adventures as Vera, a witty girl flitting from one party to the next — under the guise of uncovering more about her family.

Lauren Willig‘s latest engaging historical drama contains rich period details, flawed yet likable characters, and a few surprises along the way. Check out The Other Daughter today.

Signal by Patrick Lee (2015)

signalWith a device that can’t be explained by logic or reality, power hungry villains, and a secret government project, Signal is another fast-paced futuristic thrilling adventure. Once I got over my disappointment that we wouldn’t be seeing more of Rachel, I became engrossed in Sam’s next escapade. Brought in by his old colleague Claire, Sam must race against the clock to battle a sightless enemy with a constant advantage.

Just like the first in the series (Runner), you’ll need to suspend your disbelief. A lot of crazy stuff is going to happen, but you’ll be frantically flipping the pages to discover what comes next in Patrick Lee’s latest conspiracy novel.