Category Archives: Lucille

Mystic Pizza (1988) R

A perfect chick flick for summer! Julia Roberts, Annabeth Gish, and Lili Taylor are the dashing three musketeers, looking for love and excitement, sometimes in all the wrong places. Their humble jobs at the Mystic Pizzeria in a small town adds to the flavor of the moment. A very young Julia Roberts leads the pack as a rambunctious beauty unwilling to settle down. Enjoy.

Find Mystic Pizza at the library. And for other recent chick flicks, check out our movie list.

Annie Hall (1977) PG

This Oscar winning comedy established Woody Allen as a premier humorist, wit and inventive film maker. It’s a love story, circa the free-wheeling seventies. Diane Keaton (Annie Hall) will always be remembered as the free spirit who captures Alvy Singer’s (Allen) heart. At times the movie appears autobiographical, mirroring the life and loves of Keaton and Allen. Of course, this gives the movie a dab of notoriety.

The dialogue is intellectually witty, the best of Allen. He often speaks directly to his audience, and uses flashbacks effectively to illuminate his characters. With the release of Midnight in Paris, another Allen film, we find Woody is alive and well. Newbies to the Woody Allen cult might want to check out Annie Hall. And read a review from Roger Ebert.

The Lincoln Lawyer (2011) R

“Mickey Haller is L.A.’s top criminal defense lawyer – a fast living, freewheeling pro who does business out of the back of his classic Lincoln Town Car.”

Mickey defends a client accused of rape and murder; and the twisted plot begins, going forward and then doubling back, but always keeping us in the loop.

Matthew McConaughey plays the legendary Mickey Haller with just the right amount snarl and charm, giving the plot a new dimension. After all, someone has to defend the guilty.

Check the catalog to find the film — and you can also read the Michael Connelly book that served as inspiration for the movie.

The Getaway

The Getaway (1972) PG
Steve McQueen and Ali MacGraw are coupled in this gangster getaway adventure, reminiscent of Bonnie & Clyde. Both characters are in a badly flawed relationship. The story starts when McQueen gets paroled from prison by a dirty sheriff to rob a local bank. Of course, it’s a setup. As the action heats up and everything goes bad, one of the robbers takes two hostages, one being Sally Struthers (All in the Family) who outperforms herself as the unfaithful wife.

There are car chases, shootouts, and a trip to a garbage dump. The acting of McQueen and MacGraw raise the level of the story.

Dr. Bell and Mr. Doyle

Dr. Bell and Mr. Doyle: The Dark Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes (2000)
Fact: in the late 1800s, Arthur Conan Doyle studies for his degree in medicine. One of his teachers, Dr. Bell, introduces Doyle to his singular style of crime detection.

At first a cynic and skeptic, Doyle is slowly drawn to Bell’s ability to solve high profile murders. Bell uses profound observation, inference, and deduction as his main tools. Subconsciously, Doyle absorbs Bell’s style and method. Later the idiosyncratic Bell will become the most famous sleuth of all, Sherlock Holmes.

However, several brutal murders near the college and surrounding areas catch Bell and Doyle in a cat and mouse game that challenges them to the max. Be aware there are many gruesome aspects to the chase.

The acting, direction, and storyline are top of the line. It’s riveting. I watched it alone and survived.

Garrow’s Law. Series 1 and 2

Garrow’s Law. Series 1 and 2 (2009-2010)
I have not watched such a compelling TV series in the last ten years. It defines the word excellence on all levels—casting, acting, characterization, direction.

The storyline explores the historical evolvement of the law, gradually progressing to the “radical” idea that a man is innocent until proven guilty. Each episode covers the outcome of one courtroom drama. But the emotional changes in the main characters are pivotal to our gut response. I found this series intensely satisfying. Ah, yes!

“Courtroom drama gold”—The Sunday Times (U.K.)

Did you know the show is based on the life of pioneering 18th century barrister William Garrow? Check out the show’s website on BBC One for more details.

Spotlight: Stieg Larsson Films

Spotlight: Stieg Larsson Films
Get your money’s worth with The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire, and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest. These must-see foreign movies capture the essence of Stieg Larsson’s “best of the bestselling books.” After thoroughly enjoying the Millennium Trilogy, I thoroughly enjoyed the movies. If you have read the books, the subtitles highlight the dialogue making it easier to follow. My only regret is there will not be another book/movie in this series.

Did you know? An American version of the film is in the works starring Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara.

Glory

Glory (1989) R
This is a Civil War film, the story of the first and only black regiment, the 54th Massachusetts Cavalry, to actively participate in the bloody business of war. A young white officer from a wealthy Boston family (Matthew Broderick) takes on the grueling job of getting these men ready for battle. He is tough, untried, but idealistically driven to turn these men into soldiers and he does.

This is the heart of the story, watching the unit grow from roughshod to ready, forming bonds of friendship that reveal their own inner problems. The common desire to engage the enemy, thereby breaking down a unique military prejudice, is another absorbing part of the story.

The cast and characters grab your heart and keep it until the final second. A must see.

Also starring Denzel Washington and Morgan Freeman. Check out reviews at Rotten Tomatoes.