12 Angry Men (1957)

This film took me by surprise. It’s black and white. Most of the action takes place in a small room with the same twelve people for 90 minutes. The story is so well written, well directed, and well acted that the viewer doesn’t mind its simplicity.

In 12 Angry Men, the characters and plot evolve in a jury room. The jurors identified only as Juror #1, #2, etc., must decide the fate of an eighteen-year-old man accused of murdering his father. One brave man among the twelve votes innocent. He doesn’t necessarily believe he is innocent, but desperately believes he deserves some thoughtful discussion before being sent to the electric chair.

A thoughtful, angry discussion ensues. Eleven men are ready to write off this young man as a slum dweller who could easily commit murder. All the evidence points to the son as the killer, yet one man insists they examine the details. As a result, the personalities of the twelve begin to unfold.

We’ve created a list of films featuring Lawyers in the Movies. For more on 12 Angry Men, check out Robert Ebert’s review and the American Film Institute’s feature.

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