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The Bone Garden by Tess Gerritsen

The Bone Garden by Tess Gerritsen (2007)
Kept me quiet and intrigued for a day and a half. I couldn’t put it down! So many characters intertwined to complete the multi-generational saga.

For more medical thrillers view our staff picks here.

Agatha Raisin and the Haunted House by M.C. Beaton

Agatha Raisin and the Haunted House by M.C. Beaton (2003)
Fast reading! Intrigue! Good diversion from blood and guts murder mystery. Twists and turns on English roads through towns with historic names leads to conclusion of a murder or 3.

To get a complete list of books in the Agatha Raisin series visit M.C. Beaton's website.

I Still Dream About You by Fannie Flagg

I Still Dream About You by Fannie Flagg (2010)
A charming and heartwarming  book. I laughed and I cried.  It was well worth the wait.

Check out the author's website for more about the book.

If you like Fannie Flagg's books take a look at our list of  funny mysteries to discover your next favorite read.

The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party by Alexander McCall-Smith

The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party by Alexander McCall-Smith (2011)
Another fun, endearing book from McCall-Smith’s “No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency” series. This one has less detective stories and is slower paced, though it picks up in the middle. It’s an enchanting read.

If you enjoy “No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency” series you might like other books on our list Mysteries: Dateline Africa.

Here is the trailer for the television series based on the book.

Spotlight: The Spellmans by Lisa Lutz

Spotlight: The Spellmans by Lisa Lutz
Lisa Lutz
created a delightfully zany family in the Spellmans. Follow their hilarious antics in the quartet: The Spellman Files, Curse of the Spellmans, Revenge of the Spellmans, and The Spellmans Strike Again.

Although the Spellmans own a PI firm, the dysfunctional family spends more time spying on each other. Narrator Isabel “Izzy” Spellman is the 20-something middle daughter who never starts a story at the beginning. Following her train of thought is half the fun. The supporting cast, from the other Spellmans to the octogenarian lawyer and 40ish police detective, contributes to the entertaining atmosphere.

While the final book seemed to wrap up the series, it appears the Spellmans will be making another appearance in 2012.

If you like Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum series, try The Spellman Files. And for other books like these, check out our booklist.

The Ice Princess by Camilla Lackberg

The Ice Princess by Camilla Lackberg (2009)Another Swedish author (Steig Larrson was the first.) makes her mark in the murder industry. For once, I agree with the endorsements on the book jacket: "Chilly, deceptive and lucid, just like the icy environment it describes." --The Literary Review.

The plotting, the intertwine of characters, the environment and even the ending satisfy the reader. All things work together as the story gathers momentum. Lackberg develops her characters deftly, just enough to be realistically appealing or appalling as the case may be. This is my starred mystery for summer.

Keep up to date with the latest news about the author on her blog.

Blowback by Peter May

Blowback by Peter May (2011)
Blowback is the fifth book in the Enzo Files series. May continues Enzo’s quest to solve seven cold case murders. To really appreciate this book, you need to begin with Extraordinary People, the first book in the series. That being said, May produces another absorbing mystery.

This book takes us to the world of the three star Michelin restaurants in France where we begin to realize the dark side of the culinary arts. If you like food and France and an interesting older man with plenty of appeal, you will enjoy this book. Another point of interest is the ongoing story of Enzo's personal growth in his relations with family, friends and, being Enzo, his lovers.

Check out the authors favorite recipes.

Killing Floor by Lee Child

Killing Floor by Lee Child (1997)
A number of people have recommended this author to me, knowing that I enjoy reading mysteries and suspense novels. So, I read this book, the first in the series featuring Jack Reacher, an ex-military policeman who is now a drifter.

Reacher is a really intriguing character and the details provided in this book about currency and counterfeiting were also fascinating. I definitely plan to continue reading the other books in this series.

Find out more about the Reacher series at the authors website.

Night Fall by Nelson Demille

Night Fall by Nelson Demille (2004)
Although this is a novel, it‘s based on the true event of the crash of TWA Flight 800 in 1996 off of Long Island, NY, killing all 230 people aboard. It contains many interesting facts and theories surrounding that tragedy. It asks the question: What REALLY caused this plane to explode that evening? Demille creates an intriguing plot and fascinating set of characters, while trying to determine whether the plane was shot down by a missile or exploded due to a mechanical failure in a fuel tank, as the government concluded. Despite the tragic subject, Demille’s character, John Corey, once again adds his biting humor and sarcasm to make this a truly enjoyable, "hard to put down" book to read. If you enjoy suspense with a touch of humor, you’ll love this one.

Visit the author's website and read a review.

Dead Man’s Chest by Kerry Greenwood

Dead Man’s Chest by Kerry Greenwood (2010)
Phryne Fisher is a Melbourne, Australia, jazz age flapper and private investigator. This time, though, she is on vacation. Packing up her two adopted daughters and practical companion Dot, Phryne heads for the seaside only to find a house full of Surrealists next door, a film crew making a movie on the beach, a whole town looking for hidden treasure, and, oh yes, smugglers and a missing cook and butler. In short order, between dips in the ocean and scrumptious meals, Phryne has it all sorted. Don’t read Phryne for the mystery but for the delightful collection of characters that make up her world.

Don't miss the delightful Phyrne Fisher website!

Live to Tell by Lisa Gardner

Live to Tell by Lisa Gardner (2010)
This is a fascinating, intense, suspenseful mystery that had me hooked from the first page. It was hard to put down, even though the subject matter is quite disturbing and eye-opening; that of psychiatric disorders in children who put themselves and others at risk through violent behavior, and the effects on their parents and other caregivers. It is well-written, with strong characters – some likeable, some not – but all believable.

Learn more about the author and the Detective D.D. Warner series and preview the book.

Soulless by Gail Carriger

Soulless by Gail Carriger (2009)
Set in Victorian London, Soulless follows Alexia Tarabotti – a spinster with a secret. She’s a preternatural – without a soul – and her abilities cancel out the powers of other supernatural creatures.

It sounds farfetched, but Gail Carriger creates vivid characters and sharp humor that draw you in. I admit I don’t usually read and enjoy books with vampires, werewolves, and alternate history, but I was hooked. There’s a mystery to solve, a romance to enjoy, and secondary characters to follow.

A fun read and a good introduction to steampunk! If you enjoy Soulless, check out the next two books in the Parasol Protectorate: Changeless and Blameless.

Echo Park by Michael Connelly

Echo Park by Michael Connelly (2006)
A good L.A. crime story featuring Harry Bosch. Harry has been trying to prove who murdered a young girl for several years. Now out of retirement and working in the Open-Unsolved Unit with his current partner Kiz Rider, Harry has a chance to prove who murdered Marie Gusto. This is a good story which reveals the behind the scenes information one never gets from a newspaper about murders. The author is excellent at describing details without boring the reader. An enjoyable read for mystery fans.

Watch a YouTube.com video depicting the opening chapter and read the New York Times review.

Plum Island by Nelson Demille

Plum Island by Nelson Demille (1997)
This is the first Nelson Demille book I’ve read in many years, and I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed it. It's the first book in Demille’s John Corey series. Corey is a NYPD homicide detective staying on Long Island while recovering from gunshot wounds received in the line of duty. His friend, the police chief in the area, calls on him to “consult” on a double-murder investigation. Corey’s intelligence and insightful observations make the solving of the mystery interesting, but it’s his wise-cracking, sarcastic, often brash, humor that really makes this book enjoyable. I’m excited to read the rest of the books in this series, as well as checking out the other Demille series and stand-alone novels that I hadn’t read before.

Preview the book and learn more about this popular and prolific author.

Rag and Bone by James R. Benn

Rag and Bone by James R. Benn (2010)
Billy Boyle, currently assigned to Eisenhower's staff, was formerly a cop in South Boston. When "incidents" (such as inconvenient dead bodies) occur that threaten the Allied alliances, Billy and his driver, a former Detroit cop, investigate. In this case, it is late 1943. Eisenhower is about to come to England to plan the D-Day invasion. It is very important that the Russian allies keep up their fight on Germany's eastern front while the US, Canada, and England plan invasion from the west. So, the dead body of a Soviet spy which might be linked to the recently discovered dead Polish officers in the Katyn Woods could cause big problems for the Allied cause. Part mystery, part spy thriller, the Billy Boyle series has a great feeling for wartime England.

Read a review and visit the author's website.